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Building a New York Regional Community of Like Minded Business People

By nyctregion13831870, Feb 9 2020 02:06AM

Master Networks NY/NYC/CT Regional Workshop

https://mn227workshop.eventbrite.com

Chas Wilson,CEO of Master Networks Inc. will present "Mindset & Your Money"

Chas Wilson is President and Co-Founder of Master Networks Inc. He is known for his entrepreneurial spirit and out of the box thinking.

He has spent many years consulting small business owners and sales professionals.

Chas has a passion for helping small businesses succeed. He brings energy, fun, excitement, to the vision and mission to people and businesses.

Chas will be teaching you how to:

- Create & Protect Income from Your Business

- How To Create a Financial Mindset

- What are the 3 Money Disciplines & How to Practice Them to Create a Viable Business

Opening the event will be Rob Genovesi who owns Unleash My Beast Brand, a branding coach. He uses brand strategy, design and words to help raise the value of your business so you can charge more now and sell it for more later. He will be speaking about: Mindset & Your Brand

By nyctregion13831870, Feb 8 2019 07:04PM

Senior Year

This is your year! You’ve worked hard over the past three years to build a solid, genuine network. It’s time to put it to work.

1. Be Genuine. Over the course of your senior year, reach out to your network. Catch up with each other. Don’t just find ways that people in your network can help you, find ways that you can help people in your network. A genuine network is mutually beneficial.

2. Be a Mentee. If you haven’t found a mentor, take the time to find one, whether it is a professor, advisor or someone in the campus career center, find someone that has your best interest in mind. Someone that will take the time to guide, direct, and polish you.

3. Dive In. Your hard work has paid off. It’s time to dive in. There is a great, big world waiting for you. You are ready and well equipped, and you have an authentic network standing behind you cheering you on!

By nyctregion13831870, Aug 14 2018 12:30PM

Junior Year

Your junior year is key to networking. In between lectures, studying, parties, trips to the library or wherever you may go, make the most of your junior year. Continue cultivating a meaningful network by adding more professors, mentors, and advisors to your network, as well as, continue to search for potential internships.

1. Be Retrospective. Take a look back at your networking goals that you have set over the past two years. Did you meet them? If not, take the time to evaluate why. Where can you improve? Make any necessary changes and move forward. "It's great to have ambition to ultimately succeed in a chosen field, but don't let that make your vision too narrow too soon. Don't shut out the larger picture: that there will be dozens of ways to fail, succeed, and grow." -- Heike Currie, Program Coordinator Communications, The Juilliard School.

2. Be Innovative. Create a strong resume, and yes a resume does matter. Be creative with your resume. Use people in your network to critique it so that you are able to put your best foot forward. Now is also the time to be creative with “networking cards.” You need to have something tangible to hand out to people.

3. Be Online. Networking can happen anywhere and anytime, including online. Develop a solid reputable social media presence. Improve and polish your LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook profiles. Social media is one of the first places potential employers will look before hiring you, your presence matters.

4. Be a Dreamer. Make a list of dream companies that you would like to work for and start targeting them. Think of people in your network that might help you get your foot in the door. If possible meet and interview their employees.

By nyctregion13831870, Jul 5 2018 07:56PM

Sophomore Year

The exhilaration, challenges, and not to mention the awkwardness of your freshman year are far behind you. By now, you’ve hopefully settled on a major and are beginning to iron out a few post-graduate plans. Therefore, your sophomore year is a great time to begin to focus on specific network goals.

1. Be Polite. Set a goal to meet one new person everyday. Whether it is just saying hello or taking time to strike up a conversation, you will organically build your network, as well as, work on your people skills.

2. Be Active. Get involved with clubs and organizations that are specifically aligned with your major. By obtaining memberships to professional organizations, you can ultimately give yourself a boost in attaining future goals.

3. Be Proactive. "There is absolutely, positively no better strategy to figure out what career or careers you might want to pursue, and then break into that field, than talking to people who have done it themselves." -- Lindsey Pollak, author of Getting from College to Career. Meet with professors, mentors, potential employers, and other professionals. They have a wealth of knowledge about their specific fields and have ample contacts that could be assets to your network. They can also help you find an internship, which could potentially parlay into a post-graduate job.

By nyctregion13831870, Jun 23 2018 09:23PM

Freshman Year

The moment you step foot on your college campus is the moment you begin building your network. The people you meet at freshman orientation, in freshman lectures, at a party, in the student center, or essentially anywhere could play the most instrumental roles in your post-graduate career. There are a few easy steps to take to cultivate the connections you make your freshman year of college that can last a lifetime. These connections can turn into connections to your future, including co-workers, bosses and, of course, friends!

1. Be Gregarious. Be Social. Talk to anyone and everyone, there is no need to be picky or exclusive. "Everyone has a network. Your friends, family friends, classmates, employers, graduate teaching assistants, hairdresser, dean, librarian, professors, and, yes, neighbors, are all in your network and can help you expand your contacts. No one starts from scratch and you never know where any connection may lead." -- Lindsey Pollak, author of Getting from College to Career. Don’t be too selective in networking; keep your net wide. The average college student changes their major approximately two times; therefore, a lot can change over the course of four years. Dreams and goals could align by senior year.

2. Be Interested. Building meaningful relationships means taking time to truly get to know people. Ask questions, not just about their goals and career plans, but also about their family and hobbies. Then open up. Cultivating a meaningful network is about building genuine relationships and friendships.

3. Be Adventurous. Step out of your comfort zone. Don’t be afraid to strike up a conversation with a random stranger. Join a variety of social clubs and organizations, including Greek life. Sororities and fraternities are tight-knit groups; they will often lend a hand to their members.

4. Be Intentional. Set networking goals for yourself each semester. Whether it is joining a new club or meeting a certain number of people, always challenge yourself.

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