New York - Westchester County, Putnam County, Rockland County,

Dutchess County, Orange County, Long Island

Connecticut - Fairfield County, New Haven County, Litchfield County

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Building a NY/CT Regional Community of Like Minded Business People

By nyctregion13831870, Feb 8 2019 07:04PM

Senior Year

This is your year! You’ve worked hard over the past three years to build a solid, genuine network. It’s time to put it to work.

1. Be Genuine. Over the course of your senior year, reach out to your network. Catch up with each other. Don’t just find ways that people in your network can help you, find ways that you can help people in your network. A genuine network is mutually beneficial.

2. Be a Mentee. If you haven’t found a mentor, take the time to find one, whether it is a professor, advisor or someone in the campus career center, find someone that has your best interest in mind. Someone that will take the time to guide, direct, and polish you.

3. Dive In. Your hard work has paid off. It’s time to dive in. There is a great, big world waiting for you. You are ready and well equipped, and you have an authentic network standing behind you cheering you on!

By nyctregion13831870, Jun 23 2018 09:23PM

Freshman Year


The moment you step foot on your college campus is the moment you begin building your network. The people you meet at freshman orientation, in freshman lectures, at a party, in the student center, or essentially anywhere could play the most instrumental roles in your post-graduate career. There are a few easy steps to take to cultivate the connections you make your freshman year of college that can last a lifetime. These connections can turn into connections to your future, including co-workers, bosses and, of course, friends!


1. Be Gregarious. Be Social. Talk to anyone and everyone, there is no need to be picky or exclusive. "Everyone has a network. Your friends, family friends, classmates, employers, graduate teaching assistants, hairdresser, dean, librarian, professors, and, yes, neighbors, are all in your network and can help you expand your contacts. No one starts from scratch and you never know where any connection may lead." -- Lindsey Pollak, author of Getting from College to Career. Don’t be too selective in networking; keep your net wide. The average college student changes their major approximately two times; therefore, a lot can change over the course of four years. Dreams and goals could align by senior year.


2. Be Interested. Building meaningful relationships means taking time to truly get to know people. Ask questions, not just about their goals and career plans, but also about their family and hobbies. Then open up. Cultivating a meaningful network is about building genuine relationships and friendships.


3. Be Adventurous. Step out of your comfort zone. Don’t be afraid to strike up a conversation with a random stranger. Join a variety of social clubs and organizations, including Greek life. Sororities and fraternities are tight-knit groups; they will often lend a hand to their members.


4. Be Intentional. Set networking goals for yourself each semester. Whether it is joining a new club or meeting a certain number of people, always challenge yourself.


By nyctregion13831870, Aug 30 2017 08:21PM

You see each other at networking events, and often, if you are honest, you avoid direct eye contact and pray someone else captures your attention. After all, those stereotypes about Baby Boomers and Millennials may have a pinch of truth in them and what could the two of you possibly have in common? Little do you know, the two of you have much more in common than you realize, and the two of you actually need each other much more than you realize.


Baby Boomers know the value of a network – one that isn’t built overnight and isn’t a one-way street. Millennials often view networking, as how can this help me, but networking is a mutually beneficial two-way street. Networking is building and maintaining genuine relationships with people. It is something you begin building early on in your career, and it is something that you should never stop building. Boomers need fresh ideas and different perspectives from Millennials, as well as, insight on the latest trends and the latest technology. Millennials, not only need access to plethora of contacts, but they also need a mentor. Someone they can learn from, someone’s brain to pick, and someone to model their career after.


By being authentic with one another, you are able to bridge a generational gap, and ultimately, learn and grow from one another. Step across the room, step across the generation gap.







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